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Golf Course Yardage Markers

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In the event of making changes to tees or to the layout of the course in any way, it is essential to have your course measured and re-certified by a specialist. Take your time to determine an accurate yardage, and adjust that yardage for both the roll that you are going to get on the shot and the variables in play (such as wind, temperature, etc.). With a little practice, getting your distances becomes an easy part of the game that you will complete time after time during each round that you play.

The golfer who plays at least a couple of times a month will likely get enough benefit from a GPS unit or rangefinder to justify the expense, whereas the occasional player may decide it makes sense to save the money and get yardages ‘the old fashioned way'.

As such, the use of markers 15, 115 or 215 along the central portion 17 of the fairway 11, or the lateral side portions 16 thereof will not interfere with the mowing of the grass inasmuch as the markers can be readily established at heights substantially the same as, or slightly below, the surface of the grass after mowing.

1 is represented by a teeing area 10, a fairway 11 and a green 12. The teeing area 10, as is well known, normally has three pair (only one pair is shown) of laterally spaced, spherical markers 14 which define the forward as well as the lateral edges of the area in which a player of designated gender, or of professional standing, is to tee-up the golf ball prior to driving, or hitting, the ball onto the fairway 11. After driving the ball onto the fairway 11, and locating the driven ball, the golfer must select a club with which to strike the ball in an effort to get closer to, or reach, the green 12. Reaching the proper green 12 and putting the ball into the hole 13 in the least number of “strokes”-i.e., with the least number of club hits-is the object of the game.

The time spent in searching for a marker prolongs the time required to play a round of golf, which not only reduces the number of golfers that can play the course during a given period of time but also tends to raise the ire of those golfers waiting for the player to select a club.